Women’s soccer

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Enduring Spirit: Restoring Professional Women’s Soccer to Washington was published in September 2013. It’s the story of the first season of the NWSL’s Washington Spirit, who were kind enough to let me wander around at their practices and follow them on a couple of road trips.  It was first released for Kindle and Nook but is now available at other outlets as well.

The print version is available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.


Selected clips

Projects and indexes

Recent posts

  • Revisiting ‘Enduring Spirit’
    Enduring Spirit failed. Not just because not many people read it and I lost money on it. I had another book, Single-Digit Soccer, that didn't sell a lot, but I didn't incur any real expenses -- the cover photo was my kid's untied shoe with the laces draped over a ball -- and I had … Continue reading Revisiting ‘Enduring Spirit’
  • Will the U.S. women’s back pay demands hurt future women’s soccer players?
    I've been covering women's sports for about three decades now. Not as 100% of my job -- through most of my employment, I've had a lot of editing and online responsibilities as well as reporting -- but I've amassed a considerable amount of women's soccer stories (and a book) and a lot of women's coverage … Continue reading Will the U.S. women’s back pay demands hurt future women’s soccer players?
  • AGM wrap: U.S. Soccer board obstructs and women’s soccer moves forward … but this one guy …
    The U.S. Soccer Annual General Meeting provided expected drama at some points, unexpected non-drama at others, and unexpected drama at others. I'll get to the bit about the guy who called out the women's national team for its sportsmanship. Going bit by bit ... The Powers That Be may once again find themselves at war … Continue reading AGM wrap: U.S. Soccer board obstructs and women’s soccer moves forward … but this one guy …
  • Harvard analysis shows deeply embedded misinformation on women’s soccer pay
    It's not their faults. Harvard Business Publishing has made available -- for a fee -- a pair of articles designed to serve as a basis for classroom discussion. They're thoroughly researched by four people ("Professors Christine Exley and John Beshears and Research Associates Manuela Collis and Davis Heniford prepared this case") with roughly 100 citations. … Continue reading Harvard analysis shows deeply embedded misinformation on women’s soccer pay
  • Women’s soccer: How about equal spending in general, not just equal pay?
    Harvard Business Review had a piece on lessons to learn from the U.S. women's soccer team's "equal pay" push, which may be premature given that the lawsuit hasn't proceeded yet (and, based solely on what's going to end up presented in court, may not go well for the women). Here's how I responded: I've covered … Continue reading Women’s soccer: How about equal spending in general, not just equal pay?
  • Equal-pay play: No friendly gap, narrowed Cup bonuses
    Now that the national team pay calculator is done (more or less), we can run some scenarios. Here's one: Assumed results: Women win World Cup with 9 points in group stage, take Olympic bronze with 7 points in group stage. Men reach World Cup quarterfinals (7 points in group) one year and take 3 points … Continue reading Equal-pay play: No friendly gap, narrowed Cup bonuses
  • Why do I question women’s soccer narratives?
    I'm aggravated when people denigrate soccer because it's my favorite sport -- and because such sentiments are often rooted in a form of xenophobia in which generations have been expected to be culturally assimilated through our devotion to American sports like football, basketball and baseball. I'm aggravated when people denigrate women's sports because such sentiments … Continue reading Why do I question women’s soccer narratives?
  • A quick guide to the U.S. women’s soccer pay dispute
    This World Cup is going to be quite competitive, today's 13-0 rout notwithstanding. The bad news is that the USA's chances of winning are less than 50-50, but the good news is that the reason is the growth of the game worldwide. No one who cares about women's soccer would want the game in England, … Continue reading A quick guide to the U.S. women’s soccer pay dispute
  • Women’s World Cup predictions (collated)
    If you made predictions, feel free to share them. I'll try to compile as best I can. GROUP STAGE Key: Third-place teams that qualify marked with asterisk. The predictors ... BD: me538: from their rankingsAC: Avi Creditor, Sports IllustratedLL: Laken Litman, Sports Illustrated (you'll have to click to see the picks from Kellen Becoats, Luis … Continue reading Women’s World Cup predictions (collated)
  • Game-by-game guide to Women’s World Cup group stage
    Three basic icons here: 📺 ️- must-watch☠️ - must-win 🏏- country also playing in Cricket World Cup on same day Times Eastern Friday, June 7 3 p.m., FS1: France vs South Korea. Traditional first-day favorable matchup for the hosts. Saturday, June 8 📺 9 a.m., FS1: Germany vs China. Does China have anything to offer … Continue reading Game-by-game guide to Women’s World Cup group stage

History

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I’ve covered just about everything in women’s soccer, from an Olympic final (2008) and World Cup games (2011) to high school games and sparsely attended exhibition games in the Dark Ages between U.S. professional leagues. I’ve also covered ongoing news stories such as the feud between WPS and maverick owner Dan Borislow. When Borislow suddenly passed away, I wrote a remembrance that was one of the most popular posts in SportsMyriad history.

Some reporters are afraid to be controversial in women’s soccer coverage. I’m not. I’m willing to call out Brazilian star Marta on her gamesmanship (while still paying tribute to her skill) or lead the chorus questioning the USA’s tactics and personnel decisions. I’ve had some interesting “discussions” on Twitter with angry soccer celebrities.

The point is not to be cynical or snarky. The point is to show the reality of the situation and hold people accountable.

And as journalists, we’re beholden to the facts. So when they’re bent, as came up often in the Great U.S. Women’s Pay Dispute in 2016, it’s up to us to correct the record, popularity be damned.

Also, when a team overcomes its problems, as the USA did in the 2015 World Cup, the victory is that much more sensational.

I think people are tired of seeing female athletes treated as perfect little robots who go out and do nothing but generate positive things. The reality is much more interesting, much more important, and much more inspiring.

Full clips by topic: women’s soccer, nwsl, wps, olympics