NASL, U.S. Soccer cannot agree on court timeline

U.S. Soccer has responded to the NASL’s antitrust lawsuit — not a full-scale rebuttal of the charges, but a complaint about the NASL’s desire to get to court as quickly as possible. The USSF response goes on to say: USSF was served with the NASL complaint two days ago. (They underline it in the complaint.) That complaint is really long — 71 pages, plus three declarations totaling 113 pages (Stefan Szymanski’s is 80) NASL asked for this schedule, the USSF response says: Oct. 4: USSF response to the suit Oct. 11: NASL response to the response Oct. 18: Hearing Before all … Continue reading NASL, U.S. Soccer cannot agree on court timeline

A complete fact/reality check of the NASL lawsuit (abridged)

Apologies to Reduced Shakespeare Company for the headline. I went line-by-line through the NASL lawsuit and was intending to come back to anything that has yet to be covered in the Pro League Standards (story with PDF / standards sans PDF). After 3,000 words, I realized I was repeating myself. Or nit-picking. (In paragraph 16, the suit refers to “USFF,” and I quipped that this had nothing to do with U.S. Futsal.) Let’s just hit the generalities: This is a direct challenge of U.S. Soccer’s power to regulate pro soccer. Paragraph 4: “The USSF is a private organization and has no … Continue reading A complete fact/reality check of the NASL lawsuit (abridged)

An analysis of the ramifications of the NASL’s antitrust suit

You know that scene in Airplane that’s always cut from the TV broadcast? When Ted Striker says something’s going to hit the fan, the camera cuts to the airport office, and said something does indeed hit the fan? Yeah. That’s my analysis of the ramifications of the NASL’s antitrust suit. But, because this is how we roll, we’re going to dig deeper. The lawsuit might not be a bad thing. From the youth soccer mandates to the national team ticket prices, the U.S. soccer (lowercase) community has one major complaint against U.S. Soccer (uppercase): The Federation has become unspeakably arrogant.  So this is a … Continue reading An analysis of the ramifications of the NASL’s antitrust suit

Curling: Huge win for U.S. Olympic hopeful

Yes, it’s already curling season. In fact, we’re less than two months away from the Olympic Trials, set for Nov. 11-18. Curling isn’t the most predictable sport in the world, but the four-team (or five, pending an appeal by Todd Birr) men’s competition has a clear favorite. John Shuster has been the skip in the last two Olympics after taking bronze on Pete Fenson’s team in 2006. His current team — Tyler George, Matt Hamilton and John Landsteiner — has qualified for the World Championships three straight years and done no worse than fifth, making the playoffs each of the last … Continue reading Curling: Huge win for U.S. Olympic hopeful

Attendance check: Club over country?

Attendance at last five Atlanta United home games: July 4: 44,974 July 29: 45,006 Sept. 10: 45,314 (first game in new stadium) Sept. 13: 42,511 Sept. 16: 70,425 Attendance at last five Seattle Sounders home games: July 23: 43,528 Aug. 12: 43,350 Aug. 20: 40,312 Aug. 27: 51,796 Sept. 10: 44,697 Attendance at last five U.S. men’s national team home games: July 15: 27,934 (Gold Cup; Cleveland) July 19: 31,615 (Gold Cup quarterfinal; Philadelphia) July 22: 45,516 (Gold Cup semifinal; Arlington, Texas) July 26: 63,032 (Gold Cup final; Santa Clara, Calif.) Sept. 1: 26,500 (World Cup qualifier; Harrison, N.J. — … Continue reading Attendance check: Club over country?